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Teaching the Thruster

Taylor Johnston Coaching, Instructional, Teaching Leave a Comment

The Thruster.

Arguably one of our favorite movements, as well as one of the most challenging in almost any training scenario. The thruster is a true full body movement that combines a full-depth squat with a press to lockout overhead. It is a serious “bang for buck” movement when it comes to athletic development.

Most obviously, it develops raw strength through a complete range of motion. Athletes see gains in the below parallel front squat action as well as the shoulder to overhead press. Being such a compound movement, though, the thruster is also super demanding of the core. Midline stabilization is as much a part of the movement as anything else.

It also doubles as a power development movement. Basically, the thruster is a dynamic coupling of individual strength pieces. The power transfer from our squat through a strong hip extension (like a push press or jerk) to make the bar weightless is what allows an athlete to perform reps at volume without experiencing undue fatigue. We are working to improve power output and economy of movement.

Also worth mentioning is the mobility component. The front squat and the shoulder to overhead press both require and work to develop range of motion and stability within almost every joint in the body.

Lastly, and certainly not least, the thruster can be used in a conditioning or stamina sense for the entire body. At light loads, the movement can be performed repetitively at high speed (anaerobic capacity) or for serious aerobic volume. Or it can be performed at heavier loading for less reps within a larger set of movements. We are able to train an athlete’s ability to move his or her body, as well as an external load, under general fatigue, in a number of different settings.

Being such a useful movement, it behooves us to teach it in a comprehensive fashion. First, we must always begin by making sure our athlete has a solid understanding of proper squat and press mechanics. If we’ve mastered the air squat, and understand a simple push up, then we can add a pvc and begin to drill the thruster itself.

Instruct the athlete to bring the pvc up to the shoulders in a full grip. Elbows should be high, the goal is to keep the upper arm parallel to the floor in this front rack position. Have the athlete complete 5 good front squat reps. If these are good, we can work on the press.

With the bar back at shoulder height, instruct the athlete to take a slight dip (torso remains vertical, just a slight bend of the knees). Then, squeeze the quads and glutes violently to get the bar “weightless” and finish by locking out the arms with the bar overhead. Bar should always end over the middle of the athlete’s body – not out in front or behind.

Once we’ve gotten comfortable with the overhead portion, we can put these two pieces together. Cue the athletes to drive up with the legs aggressively out of the front squat and finish with a full lockout.

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